Rehearsal with soloists

The accompaniment skills of a conductor are very important, The conductor has to put his own ego behind him and be a partner with the soloist.  Here some examples and technical tricks to improve the art of accompaniment:

Repertoire examples:
Chopin: Piano-concerto no.2 1st movement
- the conductor should be ready to fall in the “1” after the scale of the pianist.


Chopin: Piano-concerto no.2 , 2nd movement
The conductor should be ready to fall in the “1” after the scale of the pianist, then he has to listen the quavers in the left hand for the timing of his beats, he has to listen to the triplets in order to place his beats.


Grieg: Piano – concerto 1st movement letter “C”
The conductor should give some space to the second beat, so the pianist can play out his motif. The conductor should use here a lot the “1+2+3+4+” conducting-technique.


Tschaikovsky: Violin-concerto 1st movement bar-number 51 - 56
The conductor should give some space to the soloist on the 4th beat of bar 51 and 53, from bar 54 it’s ”a tempo”.


Tschaikovsky: Violin-concerto 1st movement, bar-number 63 to 64
The conductor should give some space to the soloist on the 1st and 2nd   beat. The conductor should use here the “1+2+3+4+” conducting-technique.


Beethoven: Piano-concerto no.3 , 2nd movement, bar-number 77
The conductor should be ready to fall in the “1” after the scale of the pianist.


Schumann: Piano-concerto 3rd movement bar-number,
The conductor should conduct this section very precisely without any speed change, the pianist should play it very regularly, otherwise the section can fall apart.


Sibelius: Violin-concerto 2nd movement, 9 bars after figure 3
The conductor should anticipate the entrance of the flute, so it will be together with the figuration of the soloist.


R. Strauss: 1st horn-concerto, 3rd movement
- the motif between the soloist and the orchestra has to be well coordinated, it’s the conductors role to invite every section from the orchestra to play this motif nicely.


Nielsen: Clarinet-concerto, figure 32
The conductor should conduct the section from figure 32 very precisely , so the strings can place the syncopes.


Ibert: Flute-concerto
The conductor should conduct this section with the interior metronome , the beat-change has to be very clear, again here the “1” is important to show very clearly, especially for the second violins the “1” is important on the 4th bar of figure 3.


Paganini: Violin-concerto no.1
The conductor should give some space to the soloist on the 1st and 2nd   beat on the second bar.  Again for the conductor is useful to use the “+” technique.


Dvorak: Cello-concerto
The conductor should give a very clear “1” after the rhapsodic motif of the solo-part, in order to bring the attacks of the winds together.


Korngold: Violin-concerto – beginning 1st movement
The conductor should sing the melody of the solo-violin inside, so he can adjust the variable speed-change of him, due the “concertante” character of this section, the conductor has to mind the “interior rhythm” of the piece. (Clarinet, harp, violins, horns, double-bass – pizzicato )


Berg: Violin-concerto  1st movement, bar 218
- The conductor should be aware of  the  space between the 2 c-flats, the violinist need some time there, this is one of many examples in the whole concerto, where the conductor need a big sensibility for accompanying


Berg: Violin-concerto  2nd movement, bar 7
- The conductor should catch the violinist on his rapsodic figuration and serve a clear strong „1“ to the orchestra


Prokofiev: Piano-concerto no.2, 2nd movement, bar 63, Variation 3
- The conductor should not get irritated from the accents in the piano


Beethoven: 2nd Piano-concerto, end of  the 1st movement
- The conductor has  to catch the pianist at the end of his cadenza


Glazunov: Saxophone-concerto, 1st movement
-  The conductor has  to follow very well  the soloist for  the stringendo and the piu mosso